Archive for 1975 Gallery

Inward glimpses: “Spyglass” by Sarah C. Rutherford & Brandon Colaprete

Posted in review with tags , , , , , on June 2, 2012 by Rebecca

This post originally appeared on Rochester City Newspaper‘s art blog.

A detail from “Spyglass,” on view at 1975 Gallery through June 16. PHOTO BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

This world hasn’t lost its wonder and its magic for Sarah Rutherford – in fact she insists upon its presence and will manifest it, conjure it up from scavenged detritus wherever it’s not readily apparent. And those who also feel the sweet tug of the beautiful mystery are drawn to her luminous work like so many sleepy little moths, shaking the dust from their wings and hovering about, fascinated. On Thursday, May 31, a flurry of us swarmed to the lantern-lit preview of her new installation, “Spyglass,”created this time not with art collective, The Sweet Meat Co., but with architect Brandon Colaprete. The show is installed at the former Little Bakery spot on Charlotte Street, which will be the future, permanent home of the nomadic-no-longer 1975 Gallery.

On the approach toward the former bakery from Main Street, viewers first spy a whorl of wood surrounding a window and creating a portal; the other side of the building is illustrated with a dreamy mural of clockwork crows.

Once inside, visitors navigate distorted, twisting walls into a created room within a room, where they step into nooks or peek through globes and various found lenses into wee spaces populated by cut-out figures, animals, bones, books, gears, feathers, and all manner of natural nuance. Weatherworn warrior women stand strong, alone, or make silent appeals to elusive, reliable menfolk.

Coming from a background of painting and drawing, Rutherford says “it was wonderful working with someone who thinks in more three-dimensional terms.” Her creative partner in this exhibition is Brandon Colaprete, an architect with Chaintreuil Jensen Stark Architects, which is the firm behind the Eastman Theatre Expansion & Renovation project. In creating “Spyglass,” Rutherford felt herself starting to think differently about space. “The 2-D objects, the crows/figures, etc., became the same as the lumber – all just parts of a whole piece,” she says.

“Brandon pushed me to work in a more planned manner, at least with the overall concept/building of skeleton, and I pushed him to loosen up,” she says. “This wasn’t a building or a permanent thing we were creating. It was a place to explore ideas and concepts in a more organic way. We were creating something that will be destroyed after two weeks of being finished. I think that freedom was fun for him, but also a challenge.”

The setting feels like a fragile, broken down sylvan cathedral, a sacred spot protected by all things capably feral. And like any stumbling upon the fae world, it might not be there the next time you visit. Above the reconstructed bits of architectural salvage, more clockwork crow illustrations soar among lights and cut paper which casts layers of shadows above and below. A life-sized, seated king-of-the-forest figure presides over the scene, but various beings watch viewers from every direction. Step up to one nook to find a secret boy child on high, spying down on all.

Like all of Rutherford’s endeavors, “Spyglass” is rife with unexpected nuance, and discovering it all could fill many hours. The origin of Spyglass began with a piece Rutherford created for last year’s Sweet Meat Co. installation, “Welcome to Sweetsville,” in which she used lenses given to her by 1975 Gallery owner and fellow Sweet Meat artist, Erich Lehman, to create a little viewing box with materials scavenged from an abandoned warehouse. “I wanted to play with that same idea but on a smaller scale – drawing the viewer into a private, intimate viewing experience,” says Rutherford. “After the show, I couldn’t stop thinking about what it would be like to make a whole room act in the same way – playing with the idea on a large scale and also on a intimate scale.”

Scavenging materials for the art is ever a part of the process for Rutherford and her friends. “It’s what I do, it’s what the crows do, it’s how this show was built. We as artists are scavengers – whether we use found materials or simply scavenge ideas and visual reference from our environment,” she says.

“The crows also have such impact for me as a visual reference for Rochester,” says Rutherford. “They are an integral part of our community and so powerful when they unite as this huge group or murder of birds. It’s in the same way that I look at our community. We are all uniquely beautiful, different, but coming together has its own power that could never be created working alone.” Though “Spyglass” was primarily created by the artist pair, Rutherford says “the wonderful group of people who participated both with labor and with support are both why it exists and what fuels me.”

“For this show, it was important to me that nothing was “for sale,” says Rutherford. “I truly wanted the show to be something that was about the experience and also heavily built around impermanence.” But after working on two Sweet Meat Co. installations, Rutherford was aware of how expensive they can become. Her solution was to create an eventual takeaway component of the exhibit: each person who donates $40 dollars towards the show will receive one of the crow drawings at its completion. “I liked this idea instead of simply asking one or two people to fund the whole exhibit – this way it is funded by the community,” says Rutherford. “They are the reason it exists.”

Rutherford’s breadcrumb trail might soon appear in different cities. “This installation was very much based around the building – its shape and flow, but also based around Rochester,” assembled from “discarded and forgotten pieces of our fine city,” says Rutherford. “I would love to work on this idea in a different city, using its fabric to see how that would translate.”

“For me, this show doesn’t feel “complete”, its an exploration, a part of a whole,” says Rutherford. Each installation feels to her like a chapter from a book – they are completed in a finite period of time, build momentum and background from the last endeavor, and create anticipation for what will come next.

“Spyglass: A Viewing Experience”
by Sarah C. Rutherford & Brandon Colaprete
1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte Street
Saturday, June 2, 4-10 p.m.
Limited Showings from June 5-16:
Tuesday-Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 4-8 p.m.
OurSpyglass.com, 1975ish.com

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“Nothing New” opens Friday night

Posted in alternative spaces, art collectives, first friday, upcoming shows with tags , , , , , , on March 3, 2011 by Rebecca

If you don’t already have this reception on your First Friday trek skedge, take note. Presented by 1975 Gallery, “Nothing New: The Ruminations & Imaginings of Sarah C. Rutherford and St. Monci” will open tomorrow night, 6-9 p.m. at Booksmart Gallery (250 N. Goodman St., entrance on Anderson Alley), and will run through March 26.

Despite the title, the show will feature new, mammoth work by each artist (including a 40 foot painting by Monci) as well as collaborative works between the two. All works draw from the artists’ visual and stylistic vocabularies, each finding new ways of looking at and expressing familiar subjects. Custom frames, constructed (with the help of Felix Caruthers, who is featured in one of Rutherford’s works) of found fascinations, will grace Rutherford’s work.

Rutherford's in-prog dreamy portrait of Mary Cross (and pal), with reclaimed-object frame.

Since vague ruminations of the show settled into Rutherford’s consciousness, she’s been sharing bits and peeks of reference photos, sketches, works-in-prog, and inspirations on a virtual progress blog dedicated to this endeavor.

Last week, I stopped over to Sarah’s studio to check out her nearly-finished works, as well as many of the collab pieces with St. Monci. Rutherford’s fantastical illustration style paired with her serious portrait skills have made superhero gypsy-vagrants of her circle of muse-friends. The show “is about the people I’m painting, obviously through my lens, but I am trying to give them a power of maybe…how they’d like to see themselves,” Rutherford says, in discussing what she calls the “fantasy-aspect, edging toward superhero.” Her portrait of 1975 Gallery director Erich Lehman, for example, reveals him as a champion of the arts and patron saint of the skaters, with his gaze raised and eyes set on some soon-to-be-realized vision.

The colorful, nostalgic paintings lend a sense of urban-fairytale adventure and contain steampunk, street, and natural elements. For the collab works, Rutherford says, St. Monci would typically begin work with his ribbons and jets of spray paint, and she would play off of his colors and forms.

Collab work by Rutherford and St. Monci.

Monci’s tight, kinetic, and soaring paintwork will have room to elicit maximum awe with that giant painting he’s promised. You can preview the progress at his site or on the lovely photography blog of his eagle-eyed wife, Hannah Betts.

This show is the second presented at Booksmart by 1975 Gallery, which will hold exhibitions twice annually in the space. A small-edition exhibition catalog produced at Booksmart will accompany the show. Also, 1975’s creator, Erich Lehman, designed this rad show card.

See you there.
See you there.

First Friday, March!

Posted in alternative spaces, art collectives, first friday, pop-up galleries, quick pokes, upcoming shows with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2011 by Rebecca

So, we’ve had little teases of spring on and off, but now it’s back to frigidness (Rochester, she is a fickle bitch). Will we be bundling for Friday’s art trek, or liberated in, at best, 30something degree weather? (har)

In any case, here is a preview of some of the gems opening up this Friday (first printed in Rochester City Newspaper this morn)…

March’s art scene, like the weather, is rolling in as fiercely as a lion. First Friday, the monthly city-wide gallery night, is held by non-profit, university, and commercial and indie art venues in Rochester, where we all trot about from station to station, filling our eyes and ears with what’s new and exciting in our community. On Friday, March 4, 6-9 p.m. (and sometimes later) you can check out art openings, poetry readings, and musical performances in various locations. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a list of this month’s participating venues, and check out all the flyers in cafes and such for more events happening the same night. Here are just a few:

1975 Gallery at Booksmart Studio (250 N. Goodman St., 1975ish.com) will present a new show by two members of Sweet Meat Co., “Nothing New: The Ruminations & Imaginings of Sarah C. Rutherford and St. Monci,” with new work by both artists as well as collaborations between the two.

One of Sarah C. Rutherford and St. Monci's epic collabs in "Nothing New..." opening this Friday. More on this soon...

“Winter Blooms” will open at the Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery (713 Monroe Ave., 271-5183), and will feature artistic, functional ceramic work by Giselle Hicks and Kala Stein.

The Hungerford Urban Artisans (The Hungerford, 1115 E. Main St., thehungerford.com) will present the “FLUX: THAW at the Hungerford” in Suite 258, and continuing on Saturdays 10 a.m.-3 p.m. through March. Arti Gras comes to Anderson Alley Artists (250 N. Goodman St., 442-3516, secondsaturdayartists.com), with open studios, shopping, live Zydeco music and dancing, Friday 5-9 p.m., and continuing on Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. While in the building, be sure to check out “Collaboration Collisions” with work by local artist Heather Erwin and NYC artist Duane Sherwood, in Studio 215, 6-9 p.m.

The Mill Art Center and Gallery and The Rabbit Room (61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls., 624-7740, millartcenter.com) will host “Relevant: An HF-L Alumni Art Exhibition,” with work by Honeoye Falls-Lima High School alum, and includes work by internationally acclaimed artists. The 6 p.m. opening will feature live music by Steve Grills and the Roadmasters.

On the alternative-spaces front, check out “Book of Nights” work by Aydin Ture at Living Room Cafe (1118 Monroe Ave, thelivingroomcafe.com), 6-8 p.m. And at the Gallery at Rubino’s Cafe (1659 Mt. Hope Ave., 271-0110), 5-7 p.m., you will find “Whimsical Art” by Margot Fass, Mollie Wolf, and Martha Schermerhorn.

First Friday preview for lovely September

Posted in first friday, upcoming shows with tags , , , , on September 1, 2010 by Rebecca

OMG OMG a blog post! Apologies to the faithful readers for the absence of updates! It’s been a very busy time, but this post comes with a promise of a much stronger commitment to this project.

So here it is, your September First Friday preview, to be followed up with a post on Friday night or Saturday. This originally appeared in print in Rochester City Newspaper this morn and is available online as well.

An image from Sean Dyroff's "The Beginning" exhibition of cyanotypes, showing at The Gallery @ Equal=Grounds. PHOTO PROVIDED

 

The monthly city-wide gallery night is held by non-profit, university, and commercial and indie art venues in Rochester, where we all trot about from station to station, filling our eyes and ears with what’s new and exciting in our community. On Friday, September 3, 6-9 p.m. (and sometimes later) you can check out art openings, poetry readings, and musical performances in various locations. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a list of this month’s participating venues, and check out all the flyers in cafes and such for more events happening the same night. September’s First Friday skedge is rife with thoughtful new shows held at indie galleries and alternative spaces. Here are just a few:

Equal Grounds coffeehouse (750 South Ave, gallery@equalgrounds.com) will host an opening reception for “The Beginning,” an exhibition of cyanotypes by Sean Dyroff, “created to explore the beginning moments of the universe or the beginning moments of life, when the absence and presence of light define experience,” per the artist’s statement. At Chait Fine Art Gallery (234 Mill St., schait@chaitstudios), Stu Chait will present watercolor abstractions of the rise and fall of life in “Vinifera – An Unseen Sensitivity.” The reception takes place 6-9 p.m.

The Gallery at the Record Archive (33 1/3 Rockwood St., 244-1210) presents “My Talent is Dreaming,” paintings, sculpture, and assemblage work by A. Bogs, who will also perform musically in Bogs Visionary Orchestra at 7 p.m. The reception runs 6-9 p.m.

I’m anticipating great things from 1975 Gallery, temporarily occupying Booksmart’s Gallery Kunstler (250 N. Goodman St., 1975ish.com), which will present the enigmatic “The Worst is Yet to Come: The Unfortunate Decay of Communication Culture,” by skateboard-industry designers Mark Penxa and Don Pendleton. The promo card for the show, which opens at 6 p.m., arrived like an invitation to interpersonal communication’s calling hours, with “deepest sympathies” from the artists. Shake a fist, brothers.

Fresh & Sweet.

Posted in art collectives, pop-up galleries, upcoming shows with tags , , , on March 3, 2010 by Rebecca

Art Front’s maiden voyage will focus on a recent shiny newness that Rochester’s art scene sorely needs: independent, audacious initiative, and the community’s attention and support. So, I’m about a month late with this, but I’m still excited to share…

Sweet Meat Co. panoramic

A panoramic shot of The Sweet Meat Co.'s EXTRAVAGANZA, yoinked from their flickr site.

Recently formed art collective The Sweet Meat Co. is comprised of talented young painters, graphic designers, and street artists including Sarah Rutherford, Lea Rizzo, St. Monci, Mr. Prvrt, and Erich Lehman of 1975 Gallery at Surface Salon. Naming their group for the old-timey term for candy, the collective pays homage to the Hungerford [which used to be a flavored syrup factory] where, on 01.30.10, they debuted the fruits of their one-month collaborative project. With guest artists Jordan C. Greenhalgh and Anjolee Wolfe, Sweet Meat Co. rented a 2500 square foot raw space in the Hungerford and completely rehabbed the place into an incredibly cohesive, multi-media art installation using paint and discarded objects found in the building.

Sweet Meat Co. Sarah Rutherford

Sweet Meat indeed. Photo by The Sweet Meat Co.

Both the opening and closing receptions [a week apart] were packed, signaling to the group that the community’s behind what they’re doing. The collective plans on continuing this pop-up gallery business all around the city, so pay attention.

The Hungerford was a “good starting point,” Rutherford says, because they were allowed the freedom to completely alter the space during the month of their collaboration. The group endeavor began with a few of the artists who had exhibited in Lehman’s gallery, and most of the members barely knew each other. Then more artists were invited in, a meeting was held last November, and things progressed from there.

“I really craved the community of working with other artists; it was a lot more challenging but very rewarding at the end,” Rutherford says, noting that seven artists who all have different work schedules, and are used to creating their art solo, makes for some complications. “But in that last week [before the show], everything just emerged and came together.”

The work of MR. Prvrt and St. Monci can be seen this Friday [Mar 5] at 1975 Gallery’s Saints & PRVRTS show, and at least three of the members will have work in Thievin’ Stephen Dorobiala’s ON THE CUT stencil show at FOURWALLS Gallery opening April 2.

on the cut

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